Core temperature of meat and fish

In the culinary world, precision is key, especially when it comes to preparing meat and fish. An indispensable tool for any chef, amateur or professional, is the meat thermometer. This handy gadget takes the guesswork out of cooking, allowing you to cook any piece of meat or fish perfectly. Whether you’re aiming for a juicy steak, perfectly cooked chicken, or soft-boiled fish, the thermometer guarantees that your dish not only tastes delicious but is also safe to eat. With a meat thermometer in hand, you’ll transform any dish into a masterpiece of flavor and texture, ensuring consistent quality that will amaze your guests time and time again.

Consider these temperature guidelines as a starting point and adjust them based on your own experiences, taste preferences, and the specifics of the food you’re preparing. By experimenting and learning from each cooking experience, you can refine your skills and create dishes that perfectly match your personal preferences.

KindBleu
—–
Blue
Saignant
—–
Weird
A point
—–
Medium Rare
Demi-anglais
—–
Medium
Cuit
—–
Medium Well
Bien Cuit
—–
Well done
Bovine46°C50°C53°C55°C58°>63°C
Chicken
Turkey
70-72°C>73°C
Pig
Wild boar
63°C66°C>70°C
Lamb49°C57°C60°C
Duck breast52°C55°C58°C
Deer
Roe
52°C55°C59°C>63°C
Salmon45°C50°C55°C57°C>60°C
Tuna<46°C52°C60°C63°C
White fish58°60°C

Carryover cooking – resting

When preparing roast beef or other types of meat, it is important to be aware of the phenomenon of ‘carryover cooking‘, where the temperature of the meat continues to rise for some time after it has been removed from the oven. This is especially the case when you let the meat rest in silver foil. Resting ensures that the juices are evenly distributed, which contributes to a tender and juicy result, but it also provides a continuous internal heat, which allows the core temperature of the meat to continue to rise by 2 to 4°C.

For example, if you take roast beef out of the oven, the internal temperature may still rise by several degrees while resting. This means that if you’re aiming for a specific final temperature, you’ll need to take the meat out of the oven a little earlier, taking into account this additional increase in temperature. By taking this into account, you can prevent overcooking and achieve the perfect doneness of your meat. Remember, a reliable meat thermometer is your best friend in this situation, allowing you to accurately monitor core temperature and take your cooking to the next level.


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